PTN Evaluates Systemic Exposure of Timolol as Treatment for Infantile Hemangiomas

The Pediatric Trials Network (PTN) recently published research in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology (JAAD) that explores whether topicaltimolol used on infants is absorbed through the skin and can be detected in the blood. The newly published research shares findings from a study led by Drs. Beth Ann Drolet and Kristen Holland of the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. In this study, 76 children less than two years of age receiving timolol, as prescribed by their doctor, were monitored for a 90-day period and blood samples were collected.

Timolol is a beta blockerB that has increasingly been used for the treatment of Infantile Hemangiomas (IH), also commonly called “strawberry” birthmarks, on infants’ skin. However, little is known regarding the safety of topical timolol’s use.

In the PTN study, 75 children received a 0.5% concentration of timolol and one child received 0.25%. While it was predicted that young infants would have higher concentrations of timolol in their blood, the study found that older infants and those with thicker hemangiomas had the highest concentrations. There were no reports of serious unexpected adverse events during the 90-day study period.

An additional Phase IItrial will aid in determining the best and most effective dose of timolol in infants. However, the published research indicates that two drops of 0.5% timolol per day should not be exceeded in the treatment of small, thin hemangiomas. For the treatment of thicker hemangiomas, oral medicationD is recommended.

To learn more about the PTN timolol study, visit the timolol study page and the timolol highlight on clinicaltrials.gov.

 


Terms Guide

ATopical – Medication applied to body surfaces, such as the skin

BBeta Blocker – Medication that reduces blood pressure

CPhase II – A trial that explores the effectiveness of a medication that can last several months to years, and involve several hundred patients  

DOral Medication – Medication taken by mouth

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